Grains Research and Development

Paddock Practices

Paddock Practice articles are distributed to growers, grower groups, advisers and industry stakeholders.
These technical articles provide in-depth information about timely cropping issues as they are unfolding in the paddock and link to a wide range of GRDC resources, including GRDC northern GrowNotes and GRDC Grains Research Updates papers.

Paddock Practices articles centre on agronomic on-farm practices, regional application of research and trial outcomes and farm business management issues specific to the northern region.
If you would like to subscribe to Paddock Practices please email subscribers@grdc.com.au with the subject "Subscribe Paddock Practices".

Past issues of Paddock Practices can be found in our Media / News view them by following this link www.grdc.com.au/PaddockPractices.

  • Tips for managing cereal disease threats in 2017

    Image of Ciara Beard

    Date
    13.04.2017
    Region
    West

    Western Australian grain growers are encouraged to plan ahead for high crop disease risks in 2017 on the back of big stubble loads, widespread summer rain and warm autumn temperatures.

  • Be on alert for ascochyta blight this season

    Newsletters

    Ascochyta blight on a lentil crop

    Date
    05.04.2017
    Region
    South

    Vigilance against ascochyta blight will be critical for pulse growers across the southern region in 2017. The wet season in 2016 combined with intensive cultivation of some pulse crops and varieties led to outbreaks of ascochyta blight across South Australia and Victoria.

  • Testing time for soil nutrients pre-sowing

    Newsletters

    Craig Tophma addresses a field day in the paddock.

    Date
    30.03.2017
    Region
    West

    Matching crop inputs to soil type, soil nutrient, yield potential, plant nutritional status and seasonal forecasts is key to optimising grain production.

  • Test to control soil-borne diseases

    Newsletters

    Alan McKay

    Date
    20.03.2017
    Region
    South

    The wet season of 2016 will have favoured the multiplication of many soil-borne pathogens, with experts recommending that any growers contemplating growing wheat in paddocks following cereals or grassy pastures to consider using PreDicta B®.

  • Plan to minimise sclerotinia risk in 2017

    Newsletters

    Sclerotinia stem rot in canola

    Date
    15.02.2017
    Region
    South

    Planning ahead will be critical for canola and pulse growers looking to reduce the risk of sclerotinia stem rot in 2017.

  • Tips and tools for mapping in VRT crop input and management systems

    Newsletters

    Grains

    Date
    06.02.2017
    Region
    West

    Inconsistent yields across a paddock, coupled with a changing climate and declining commodity terms of trade, are prompting Western Australian grain growers to seek new and innovative approaches to managing crop inputs according to soil variation.

  • Managing trace elements for yield gain

    Newsletters

    Image of Chris Dowling

    Date
    19.01.2017
    Region
    North

    Managing the balance of crop nutrients to maximise yields requires a combination of measuring and monitoring both macronutrients and trace elements.

  • Surveys uncover importance of targeted summer weed control in non-cropped areas

    Newsletters

    Grains

    Date
    11.01.2017
    Region
    West

    Growers are being advised to target herbicide and other control tactics to the correct weed species in both cropped and remnant areas this summer to benefit 2017 crops.

  • Research proves value of stubble retention

    Newsletters

    Grains

    Date
    13.12.2016
    Region
    North

    New research is proving the dramatic impact of stubble retention on soil moisture, with preliminary trial results showing a variance of up to 150mm in rainfall requirements to fill soil moisture profiles.

  • Early deep ripping and crop responses

    Newsletters

    Grains

    Date
    12.12.2016
    Region
    West

    Research in Western Australia is finding deep ripping to 50-70 centimetres can lift wheat, canola and lupin yields by helping to alleviate subsoil compaction.
    But timing this strategic tillage operation can be problematic.