Grains Research and Development

Ground Cover Issue 103 - Water Use Efficiency

Ground Cover Supplement 103: Water Use Efficiency

Catch more, store more, grow more

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  • Combined effort takes on efficiency challenge

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    South, West, National
    Author(s)
    Dr Darren Hughes

    The five-year, $17.6 million Water Use Efficiency Initiative was established in 2008 to challenge growers and researchers to lift the water use efficiency (WUE) of grain-based production systems by 10 per cent across Australia’s southern and western cropping regions.

  • Early sowing lowers production risk

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Author(s)
    Janet Paterson

    Early-sown wheats included in the mix provide large yield boost and lower production risk

  • Gypsum improves yield on responsive soils

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    West
    Author(s)
    David Hall and Jeremy Lemon

    Clearer guidelines have been established for gypsum use along Western Australia’s southern coast and how to achieve an economic yield response

  • Short and long-term focus needed to lift WUE

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    South, National, North, West
    Author(s)
    Dr John Kiregaard and Dr James Hunt

    Pre-crop management is more important than in-crop management in lifting the water use efficiency (WUE) and yield of wheat cropping systems.

  • Control summer weeds to reap yield benefits

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    South, North, West
    Author(s)
    Dr James Hunt

    Controlling summer fallow weeds has emerged as one of the largest single contributors to improved water use efficiency across southern Australia

  • The GRDC National Water Use Efficiency Initiative

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    National, South, West, North

    Between 2008 and 2013 the GRDC is investing $17.6 million in regional
    grower groups and research agencies to improve the water use efficiency (WUE) of grain-based farming systems in the southern and western regions by
    10 per cent. CSIRO leads a national project that provides science and crop,
    soil and climate modelling support to each of the groups, and organises a national initiative to facilitate sharing of information and experiences.

  • Match nitrogen to soil type to lift crop profits

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    South
    Author(s)
    Janet Paterson

    Wheat yield and farm profit can be increased significantly by lifting nitrogen rates on sandy soils and reducing those on heavier soils in the Mallee region of South Australia

  • Benchmarking - the key to improving productivity and WUE

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    South, National, North
    Author(s)
    Dr John Kirkegaard and Dr James Hunt

    The old adage that ‘you can’t manage what you don’t measure’ certainly applies to water use efficiency (WUE), but the many definitions and methods of calculating WUE can make quantifying this important productivity measure confusing

  • Wider rows: more practical but lower yield

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    South, North
    Author(s)
    Nick Poole

    Research by Riverine Plains Inc under the GRDC’s Water Use Efficiency Initiative has found the move to a wider row spacing of 37.5 centimetres has few benefits beyond allowing easier inter-row sowing

  • Securing yields on the edge

    Ground Cover

    Grains

    Article Date
    04.03.2013
    Region
    West
    Author(s)
    Janet Paterson

    Even on the eastern edge of the Western Australian wheatbelt, in an area known affectionately as the ‘western goldfields’, there is potential to lift grain yields