Pest suppressive landscapes

Northern region native vegetation habitat for beneficials

Native vegetation patches in cropping landscapes are important for the recruitment of beneficials into crop fields early in the season.

If you are thinking about revegetation there are many ‘low-risk’ native plants that do not harbour pests but do support beneficials. The species below have been identified as suitable habitat for beneficials in the northern region.

Plant Description Beneficial

Berry saltbush (Rhagodia parabolica)

A perennial plant that flowers from spring through to early January.

Spiders, ladybird beetles, rove beetles and brown lacewings.

Climbing saltbush (Einadia nutans)

Perennial plants that mainly flower spring through to January.

Spiders, ladybird beetles, rove beetles and brown lacewings.

Black roly poly (Sclerolaena muricata var. muricata)

Perennial small shrub.

Spiders, ladybird beetles, rove beetles, and brown and green lacewings, predatory bugs such as the brown smudge bug, damsel bug and spiny shield bugs.

Sally wattle (Acacia salicinia) and Swamp wattle (Acacia stenophylla)

Perennial plants that flower mainly during winter.

Spiders, ladybird beetles, brown and (adult) green lacewings and spiny shield bugs.

Wilga (Geijera parviflora)

Perennial plant that flowers winter through spring. Not widely grown due to difficulties in propagation.

Spiders, ladybird beetles, brown and green lacewings and assassin bugs.

Brigalow

Perennial plant that generally flowers April through October (not every year).

Spiders, ladybird beetles, brown and green lacewings and assassin bugs.