Grains Research and Development

GRDC Update Papers

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This page contains papers from the GRDC Update series for both growers and advisers.

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  • Russian wheat aphid a new pest of Australian cereal crops

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    02.08.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Ardrossan 2 August 2016 and Dimboola 11 August 2016
    Region
    South

    • Russian wheat aphid (RWA) is a significant new pest of South-East Australian cereal crops.
    • The known distribution of RWA is still limited to parts of South Australia (SA) and Victoria (Vic). Suspect aphids found outside of these areas should be reported to biosecurity authorities in all State jurisdictions.
    • RWA is a manageable pest, with a combination of effective cultural, chemical, biological and (longer-term) plant resistance controls available.

  • Pulse market update factors likely to impact supply demand and pricing in the next six to twelve months

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    02.08.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Ardrossan 2 August 2016
    Region
    South

    • Try to delay final paddock planning to enable input on pulse prices and areas being planted in Canada and U S.
    • Be aware of markets for other pulses like desi and kabuli chickpeas and green lentils in addition to red lentils.
    • In years when there are large increases in planted area of lentils consider low risk forward selling to lock in high prices for part of the lentil crop.
    • Remember that Canadian and Australian lentils are traded much earlier these days compared with the past providing earlier price signals for growers.

  • New insights into slug and snail control

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    02.08.2016
    GRDC Project Code
    DAS00134, SAM00001
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Ardrossan 2 August 2016.
    Region
    South

    • Applying an integrated approach can limit the threats snails and slugs pose to grain crops:
    o Cameras are another tool to be added to the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) tool kit.
    • Bait needs to be applied when snails and slugs are active and feeding, with the timing varying depending on paddock conditions and the species present.
    • Pest threats vary between seasons.

  • Evapotranspiration service helps lift farm water productivity

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016.
    Region
    North

    • Evapotranspiration (ET) provides an objective estimate of plant water use and irrigation requirement.
    • The use of ET data can provide valuable learnings about irrigation management on farm, particularly when it is used in conjunction with other scheduling methods.
    • Irrigators have been using a free weekly ET email service to inform irrigation scheduling decisions and some have improved farm water productivity as a result.
    • GRDC Update delegates are welcome to ‘get on board’ and subscribe to the ET email updates. Contact Rob O’Connor at robert.oconnor@ecodev.vic.gov.au

  • Lessons learnt from using soil moisture probes

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016.
    Region
    North

    • Soil moisture probes can be regarded as another tool in the farmer’s tool box to better understand the interaction of soil and crop water use.
    • A probe will enable you to see where the water extraction is coming from, and how much moisture capacity there is in the profile as the crop develops.
    • Collecting crop water use data allows you to make better irrigation decisions for future crops.
    • A probe gathers the moisture information day in day out, it doesn’t change its mind or forget nor does it only remember the good bits.
    • Develop a good relationship with your probe supplier/installer.

  • Markets for hay whats under the bonnet

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016.
    Region
    North

    • In 2016 additional cereal hay has been welcomed by buyers and absorbed into the market.
    • The scale of pasture hay production has a massive impact on cereal hay demand.
    • The dairy sector is likely to avoid buying hay in 2017 and a broad range of buyers is advised.
    • Export hay should be in the marketing mix as it should be a high paying market in 2017.
    • The Chinese glut of dairy products should reduce this year, supporting continued growth in hay imports of oaten hay from Australia.

  • The future of irrigation whats in store

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016.
    Region
    North

    • Rainfall changes over time and these changes are amplified in streamflows / dam inflows. The extent of this amplification will be greater in systems where the source catchments are drier.
    • Reductions in runoff under long dry periods are larger than reductions that occur for short droughts irrespective of catchment location.
    • Generally drier, flatter and more cleared catchments are more susceptible to larger than expected runoff reductions and reduction has been less pronounced in our main water supply catchments.

  • Winter canola for grazing and grain production

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    GRDC Project Code
    CSP00160, SFS00020, SFS00028
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016.
    Region
    North

    • Dual-purpose winter canola can provide significant benefits to the farm enterprise. High crop growth rates in suitable conditions results in nutritious feed on offer during the summer and autumn period. Forage value is comparable to commercially available dedicated forage rapes over summer and autumn with the added benefit of oil seed production.
    • Current winter canola cultivars are suited to a wide sowing window from spring through to early autumn as the crop requires cold temperatures to initiate flowering. Experiments from the medium and high rainfall zones of south-eastern Australia indicate that established crops can survive harsh summer conditions. However, further research is advisable prior to widespread adoption in irrigated areas to ensure the crop flowers in an appropriate window.
    • Grazing management and the timing of livestock removal is critical to maximise yield.

  • On farm grain storage creating value for the business

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    GRDC Project Code
    PRB00001
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016
    Region
    North

    • Grain growers often store grain for a variety of reasons, ensure you plan and can match your goals with a system that is effective and supports best practise.
    • The preservation of phosphine as an insect control tool, through correct use in gas-tight sealed storages, is critical to maintaining grain quality during long-term storage.
    • Successful grain storage relies on an integrated quality management approach, combining grain hygiene, monitoring, sealed gas-tight storage and aeration.
    • Once grain is in on-farm storage, the system becomes an integral part of the supply and food chain.

  • The impact of irrigation and nitrogen management on nitrogen uptake and yield in maize

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    28.07.2016
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Moama 28 July 2016
    Region
    North

    • In the 2015/16 season, crop nitrogen uptake and grain yield were increased by applying 75 per cent of the predicted crop nitrogen requirement upfront and 25 per cent in-crop compared to 40 per cent upfront and 60 per cent in-crop.
    • Monitoring of soil moisture is critical to maximise production and productivity of key resources such as water and nitrogen.