Grains Research and Development

GRDC Update Papers

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This page contains papers from the GRDC Update series for both growers and advisers.

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  • Riverine Plains Inc research update

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    16.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    RPI0009
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Corowa, 16 February 2017.
    Region
    North, South

    • Riverine Plains Inc conducts a range of research activities to provide local information to members.
    • Large farm scale trials provide grower-relevant information.
    • Decisions on stubble management require consideration of the whole system across a range of seasonal conditions.

  • Septoria tritici blotch rears its head in central and southern NSW

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00177
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    North

    • The widespread occurrence of septoria tritici blotch (STB) across southern NSW was exacerbated by the unusually wet winter of 2016.
    • The risk to crops in 2017 is higher than average with inoculum carryover expected to be high but disease development will be dependent on rainfall and timing of sowing.
    • The fungicide resistance status of the NSW population will be provided during the update.
    • Current popular varieties are vulnerable to infection and yield loss under favourable disease conditions.
    • Fungicide resistance management strategies need to be implemented on-farm.
    • Integrated disease management complements fungicide resistance management.
    • To slow fungicide resistance, do not apply the same triazole active ingredient more than once in a season.

  • Managing metabolic resistance in ryegrass with the existing pre emergence chemistries

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    UWA00171
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.

    • Sakura® resistance can evolve in ryegrass.
    • Two ryegrass populations show cross resistance between Sakura® and Boxer Gold®.
    • An organo phosphate insecticide can reverse trifluralin resistance.

  • A preliminary exploration of non coeliac gluten avoidance behaviours in Australia

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    National

    1. The prevalence of non-coeliac gluten avoidance appears to have plateaued at a rate of approximately 20%, which emulates prevalence rates in other developed countries.
    2. Gluten avoiders have been found to avoid more of everything food related, experience negative symptoms more frequently (both after food consumption and in general) and perceive food-related risks as more serious.
    3. Inherent psychological differences appear to be involved in gluten avoidance, and therefore, it is unlikely that there will be significant increases in future prevalence rates.
    4. Further analyses are being undertaken to identify which psychological factors best predict non-coeliac gluten avoidance.

  • The key drivers of high end irrigated wheat yields

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00198
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    North

    • Correct varietal selection and optimal agronomic management can result in irrigated wheat yields of over 10t/ha. Cobra was the highest yielding variety with an average yield of 10.79t/ha when averaged across both trials. LongReach Trojan, Beckom and Chara also yielded well.
    • As plant population increased from 120 plants/m2 to 200 plants/m2, the average grain yield declined by 0.15t/ha.
    • Varietal differences in grain protein content were observed with the durum line 280913 achieving the highest grain protein content in both trials. Wallup, EGA Bellaroi, Corack and Mace also achieved high grain protein content.
    • Nitrogen (N) timing significantly affected grain protein and lodging. Grain protein content increased and lodging decreased as N application was delayed.
    • The incidence of lodging increased as plant population increased.

  • Enhancing availability of nutrients from soil organic matter and crop residues

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00169
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    North

    • Crop residue incorporation in soil at 10 tonnes per hectare can enhance the supply of major nutrients — nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) — to the value of $150 to $300 per hectare, depending on soil type and management practices. In the long term, however, about half the amount of crop residue input and nutrient $ value is expected.
    • Crop residues have the potential to release more available P and S from the soil nutrient reserves than the total amount of P and S added to soil through the residues.
    • Canola residues cause higher soil carbon (C) mineralisation and consequently provide greater N, P and S supply following its incorporation in soil compared with wheat residues.
    • Tillage increases soil C mineralisation and available N, P and S supply from organic matter in soil, compared to no-till and perennial pasture.
    • Growers must, however, consider advantages and disadvantages of tillage before changing systems (such as enhanced nutrient supply versus preservation of soil structure and C). It is essential that enhanced nutrient supply via tillage and crop residue input before sowing are to be aligned to meet early crop demand to minimise nutrient losses, while supporting crop productivity and profitability.

  • Barley agronomy in southern NSW 2016

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00173
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    North

    Highest grain yields were attained from mid-May sowing across all barley varieties.
    Longer season varieties performed well in 2016 season across sites, while varieties such as La Trobe, Rosalind and Spartacus CL all performed solidly.
    Lodging was prevalent in 2016, significantly reducing grain yield in some treatments and highlighting susceptibility of some varieties.

  • Septoria fungicide control update and latest developments in rust management

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    FAR 00004, FAR00002
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    National

    • There should continue to be a focus on the principles of an integrated disease management (IDM) approach to control diseases such as STB, using rotation, cultivar resistance, later sowing, and other aspects of cultural control to complement fungicide control.
    • New research on foliar fungicides indicates that the principal foliar fungicides still give good in-field control of STB up to 30 days after application when applied at full label rates.
    • There are significant differences in disease control of STB and leaf rust amongst the different fungicide products and rates of application when monitored leaves are assessed more than 30 days after application.
    • Single spray timings of foliar fungicide for control of STB made during the late tillering phase gave less effective disease control than applications made at first node (GS31). Spray application delayed until flag leaf gave the poorest control of STB but gave superior leaf rust control later in the season.
    • Combining two adult plant resistance (APR) genes in Avocet Near Isogenic Lines (NILs) reduced the maximum yield response to stripe rust control from (significant responses) 0.98 and 0.4t/ha where the single genes were used along down to non-significant response of 0.22t/ha where the genes were combined.

  • Canola disease update

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00177, UM0051
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017; GRDC Grains Research Update in Bendigo, 21-22 February 2017.

    • Sclerotinia stem rot is a production issue where spring rainfall is adequate to provide long periods of leaf wetness in the presence of flowering canola crops.
    • If there is a history of sclerotinia stem rot in your district causing yield loss, be prepared to use a foliar fungicide to reduce yield loss.
    • Sclerotinia stem rot occurred in those districts with a frequent history of the disease in 2016. Wet conditions in spring were ideal for disease development.
    • Extended periods of leaf wetness (approx. 48 hours) are ideal for triggering epidemics of stem rot.
    • Foliar fungicides for management of the disease are best applied at 20-30% bloom for main stem protection.

  • A pulses update for southern NSW 2017

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    14.02.2017
    Presented At
    GRDC Grains Research Update in Wagga Wagga, 14-15 February 2017.
    Region
    North

    • Paddock selection is a critical management factor for growing pulse crops.
    • Maintain soil pHCa above 5.5 in the top 0-10cm to maximise plant health and potential grain yield.
    • Sowing within the recommended sowing window is critical on acidic soils of southern NSW.
    • Follow herbicide label recommendations for in-crop use and importantly plant back periods.
    • Choose a variety based on yield ranking, disease resistance, seed size, and marketability in your area.
    • Sow germination-tested, high quality seed at the recommended target plant densities.
    • Increase target plant densities when sowing late in the sowing window.
    • Follow disease management guidelines for southern NSW.
    • Maximise the potential for nitrogen (N) fixation through effective inoculation techniques.
    • Prices can be volatile, therefore the benefits of pulses should be viewed across the rotation and the whole farming system.