DAS00137 - National improved molecular diagnostics for disease management.

Project Summary

Project Start Date
30 June 2013
Project End Date
30 June 2018
Supervisor Name
Alan McKay
Organisation
South Australian Research & Development Institute
Region
South
Summary

Soil-borne diseases cause significant and often unexpected yield losses in broadacre crops. Annual potential national losses in wheat from soil and stubble-borne pathogens have recently been estimated to exceed $1,060 million and $792 million, respectively.

Most decisions to minimise the risk from soil-borne disease need to be made before seeding, but determining which diseases pose the greatest risk can be difficult, as pathogen levels respond to changes in climate variability, farm practices, cropping sequence and crop varieties.

This project will contribute to the output of the national program 'Improving grower surveillance, management, epidemiology and tools to manage crop disease' by:

    1. Developing new knowledge and diagnostic tools for advisors and growers to determine an effective balance of genetic, cultural and chemical options that will support integrated management of crop disease to reduce impacts on yield, quality and crop returns.
    2. Support other research programs investigating emerging diseases affecting grain quality and production by providing improved molecular diagnostic monitoring and early-warning tools to reduce costs and losses for growers.
    3. Upgrading the resource manual on management of soil-borne diseases and delivering workshops for advisors, leading growers and researchers, nationally.

Key contributions to be achieved by this project are:

    1. New knowledge, tools and technologies that provide an effective balance of genetic, cultural and chemical options for disease control and that support the integrated management of crop disease and impacts on yield, quality and crop returns.
    2. Manage and prioritise emerging pathogen risk by improving knowledge of epidemiology for current and emerging diseases through systematic survey and modelling.
    3. An increased focus on emerging diseases affecting grain quality and production and improved molecular diagnostic field monitoring, early-warning tools and models which will reduce costs and losses for growers.
    4. Increased grower and advisor use of an integrated approach using resistant varieties, cultural management and chemical options to support crop planning and in-crop disease minimisation.
    5. Targeted plant disease training for advisors so growers can have access to independent information to manage crop disease appropriate to their geographic circumstances and crop rotations.

Published Date
20 August 2015
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